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[Ber89]  SIAS, Strokes Interpreted Animated Sequences

Berkel:1989:SSI (Article)
Author(s)Berkel (van) P.
Title« SIAS, Strokes Interpreted Animated Sequences »
JournalComputer Graphics Forum
Volume8
Number1
Page(s)35--47
Year1989
URLhttp://www.eg.org/EG/CGF/volume8/issue1/v08i1pp35-47_abstract.html

Abstract
The goals of the bulk of commercial computer systems for graphics and animated film/video are different from the kind of systems involving the production of art. The former systems are developed for industrial application. Accurate technical communication and precise representation of measures are the main goals of the drawings and the coloured plates intended for industrial application. In the arts, however, the main goal of a drawing, a painting, or an animated film/video is beauty. The visual artist searches for an equilibrium between proportions of different shapes and an equilibrium between different colours. A system able to help in this search must therefore have its roots in art, i.e. the so-called modern art. Starting from my experience in painting, in animated film by pencil drawing, and in computer animation, I concluded that a scene could be represented very effectively and accurately by the technique of painting and drawing. The system presented for automatic painting of scenes within a 3D space that are changing in time, is based on the tradition of drawing and painting. The system must be applicable within the visual arts and video production. An experimental computer animation system SIAS (Strokes Interpreted Animated Sequences) has been developed which produces coloured shapes that are similar to the strokes put on a canvas by a painter.

BibTeX code
@article{Berkel:1989:SSI,
  optpostscript = {},
  www = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/69154},
  number = {1},
  optnote = {},
  author = {Pierre van Berkel},
  optkey = {},
  optannote = {},
  url = {http://www.eg.org/EG/CGF/volume8/issue1/v08i1pp35-47_abstract.html},
  localfile = {papers/Berkel.1989.SSI.pdf},
  optkeywords = {},
  journal = j-CGF,
  optmonth = {},
  optciteseer = {},
  volume = {8},
  optdoi = {},
  abstract = {The goals of the bulk of commercial computer systems for graphics
              and animated film/video are different from the kind of systems
              involving the production of art. The former systems are developed
              for industrial application. Accurate technical communication and
              precise representation of measures are the main goals of the
              drawings and the coloured plates intended for industrial
              application. In the arts, however, the main goal of a drawing, a
              painting, or an animated film/video is beauty. The visual artist
              searches for an equilibrium between proportions of different
              shapes and an equilibrium between different colours. A system able
              to help in this search must therefore have its roots in art, i.e.
              the so-called modern art. Starting from my experience in painting,
              in animated film by pencil drawing, and in computer animation, I
              concluded that a scene could be represented very effectively and
              accurately by the technique of painting and drawing. The system
              presented for automatic painting of scenes within a 3D space that
              are changing in time, is based on the tradition of drawing and
              painting. The system must be applicable within the visual arts and
              video production. An experimental computer animation system SIAS
              (Strokes Interpreted Animated Sequences) has been developed which
              produces coloured shapes that are similar to the strokes put on a
              canvas by a painter.},
  title = {{SIAS}, {S}trokes {I}nterpreted {A}nimated {S}equences},
  pages = {35--47},
  year = {1989},
}

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