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[DBH+03]  Rendering and Affect

Duke:2003:RAA (Article)
Author(s)Duke D., Barnard P., Halper N. and Mellin M.
Title« Rendering and Affect »
JournalComputer Graphics Forum (Proceedings of Eurographics 2003, Granada, Spain, September 1--6, 2003)
Volume22
Number3
Page(s)359--368
Year2003
AddressOxford
Editor(s)Pere Brunet and Dieter W. Fellner

Abstract
Previous studies at the intersection between rendering and psychology have concentrated on issues such as realism and acuity. Although such results have been useful in informing development of realistic rendering techniques, studies have shown that the interpretation of images is influenced by factors that have little to do with realism. In this paper, we summarize a series of experiments, the most recent of which are reported in a separate paper, that investigate affective (emotive) qualities of images. These demonstrate significant effects that can be utilized within interactive graphics, particularly via non-photorealistic rendering (NPR). We explain how the interpretation of these results requires a high-level model of cognitive information processing, and use such a model to account for recent empirical results on rendering and judgement.

BibTeX code
@article{Duke:2003:RAA,
  number = {3},
  author = {David J. Duke and Philip J. Barnard and Nick Halper and Mara
            Mellin},
  optkey = {},
  optseries = {},
  editor = {Pere Brunet and Dieter W. Fellner},
  localfile = {papers/Duke.2003.RAA.pdf},
  address = {Oxford},
  publisher = {Blackwell Publishers},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8659.00683},
  optmonth = sep,
  journal = EUROGRAPHICS2003,
  organization = {The Eurographics Association},
  opturl = {},
  volume = {22},
  optwww = {},
  optcrossref = {},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of Eurographics 2003},
  optstatus = {},
  title = {{R}endering and {A}ffect},
  abstract = {Previous studies at the intersection between rendering and
              psychology have concentrated on issues such as realism and acuity.
              Although such results have been useful in informing development of
              realistic rendering techniques, studies have shown that the
              interpretation of images is influenced by factors that have little
              to do with realism. In this paper, we summarize a series of
              experiments, the most recent of which are reported in a separate
              paper, that investigate affective (emotive) qualities of images.
              These demonstrate significant effects that can be utilized within
              interactive graphics, particularly via non-photorealistic
              rendering (NPR). We explain how the interpretation of these
              results requires a high-level model of cognitive information
              processing, and use such a model to account for recent empirical
              results on rendering and judgement. },
  year = {2003},
  pages = {359--368},
}

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