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[Han05b]  The Future of Computer Graphics: Realism or Abstraction?

Hanrahan:2005:FCG (Miscellaneous document)
Author(s)Hanrahan P.
Title« The Future of Computer Graphics: Realism or Abstraction? »
How publishedKeynote talk at Electronic Imaging 2005 (16--20 January 2005, San Jose, California, USA)
Year2005

Abstract
The big idea in computer graphics, what makes CG different than other ways of making and representing images, is that CG represents images symbolically. The result is that we are not constrained to conventional media, we may invent new abstract image models, and the associated computational processes that convert the models to concrete images. Somewhat surprisingly, most of computer graphics research has focused on the science and technology for making photorealistic images representing the physical world. But there are alternate, non-representational, image models that better depict our mental models of the world. Such abstract image representations are often more informative and more expressive than realistic ones. Historical examples include statisticial graphics, thematic maps, and engineering drawings. Future possibilities are smart illustrations and information visualizations. In this talk, I will explore the future of abstract image representations, touching on both the scientific and technological opportunities.

BibTeX code
@misc{Hanrahan:2005:FCG,
  howpublished = {Keynote talk at Electronic Imaging 2005 (16--20 January 2005,
                  San Jose, California, USA)},
  month = jan,
  optnote = {},
  author = {Pat Hanrahan},
  optkey = {},
  optannote = {},
  localfile = {papers/Hanrahan.2005.RAF.pdf},
  abstract = {The big idea in computer graphics, what makes CG different than
              other ways of making and representing images, is that CG
              represents images symbolically. The result is that we are not
              constrained to conventional media, we may invent new abstract
              image models, and the associated computational processes that
              convert the models to concrete images. Somewhat surprisingly, most
              of computer graphics research has focused on the science and
              technology for making photorealistic images representing the
              physical world. But there are alternate, non-representational,
              image models that better depict our mental models of the world.
              Such abstract image representations are often more informative and
              more expressive than realistic ones. Historical examples include
              statisticial graphics, thematic maps, and engineering drawings.
              Future possibilities are smart illustrations and information
              visualizations. In this talk, I will explore the future of
              abstract image representations, touching on both the scientific
              and technological opportunities.},
  title = {{T}he {F}uture of {C}omputer {G}raphics: {R}ealism or
           {A}bstraction?},
  year = {2005},
}

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