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[Pug92]  Designing Solid Objects Using Interactive Sketch Interpretation

Pugh:1992:DSA (In proceedings)
Author(s)Pugh D.
Title« Designing Solid Objects Using Interactive Sketch Interpretation »
InProceedings of the 1992 Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics
Editor(s)Marc Levoy and Edwin E. Catmull
Page(s)117--126
Year1992
PublisherACM Press
AddressCambridge, MA
Editor(s)Marc Levoy and Edwin E. Catmull

Abstract
Before the introduction of Computer Aided Design and solid modeling systems, designers had developed a set of techniques for designing solid objects by sketching their ideas on pencil and paper and refining them into workable designs. Unfortunately, these techniques are different from those for designing objects using a solid modeler. Not only does this waste avast reserve of talent and experience (people typically start drawing from the moment they can hold a crayon), but it also has a more fundamental problem: designers can use their intuition more effectively when sketching than they can when using a solid modeler. Viking is a solid modeling system whose user-interface is based on interactive sketch interpretation. Interactive sketch interpretation lets the designer create a line-drawing of a de- sired object while Viking generates a three-dimensional ob- ject description. This description is consistent with both the designer’s line-drawing, and a set of geometric constraints either derived from the line-drawing or placed by the de- signer. Viking’s object descriptions are fully compatible with the object descriptions used by traditional solid modelers. As a result, interactive sketch interpretation can be used with traditional solid modeling techniques, combining the advan- tages of both sketching and solid modeling.

BibTeX code
@inproceedings{Pugh:1992:DSA,
  author = {David Pugh},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 1992 Symposium on Interactive 3{D} Graphics},
  editor = {Marc Levoy and Edwin E. Catmull},
  optstatus = {abstract},
  address = {Cambridge, MA},
  localfile = {papers/Pugh.1992.DSO.pdf},
  abstract = {Before the introduction of Computer Aided Design and solid
              modeling systems, designers had developed a set of techniques for
              designing solid objects by sketching their ideas on pencil and
              paper and refining them into workable designs. Unfortunately,
              these techniques are different from those for designing objects
              using a solid modeler. Not only does this waste avast reserve of
              talent and experience (people typically start drawing from the
              moment they can hold a crayon), but it also has a more fundamental
              problem: designers can use their intuition more effectively when
              sketching than they can when using a solid modeler. Viking is a
              solid modeling system whose user-interface is based on interactive
              sketch interpretation. Interactive sketch interpretation lets the
              designer create a line-drawing of a de- sired object while Viking
              generates a three-dimensional ob- ject description. This
              description is consistent with both the designer’s line-drawing,
              and a set of geometric constraints either derived from the
              line-drawing or placed by the de- signer. Viking’s object
              descriptions are fully compatible with the object descriptions
              used by traditional solid modelers. As a result, interactive
              sketch interpretation can be used with traditional solid modeling
              techniques, combining the advan- tages of both sketching and solid
              modeling.},
  title = {{D}esigning {S}olid {O}bjects {U}sing {I}nteractive {S}ketch
           {I}nterpretation},
  publisher = {ACM Press},
  optmonth = {mar--apr},
  doi = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/147156.147178},
  pages = {117--126},
  year = {1992},
}

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